New Underage Gun Marketing Law Could Hurt Youth Shooting Programs – KCRA Sacramento | Region & Cash

Four years ago, Joseph, son of Michelle Perez, decided he didn’t want to play baseball anymore. So he took up shooting instead. Perez said her son had been interested in target shooting since his freshman year in high school, when he learned how firearms worked and the discipline associated with skeet shooting. “It’s a sport. Similar to soccer and baseball, except we use guns,” Perez said. She went on to explain, “We don’t use AR-15s. We don’t use handguns. We don’t use anything of the type now portrayed as an assault weapon. We use shotguns… They’re for hunting and they’re for shooting clay pigeons.” These pigeons or discs are the targets of the shooters. “They stand there and say, ‘Train!’ and a sound flies away from them and they shoot,” Perez said. However, a new law in California aimed at banning the marketing of firearms to minors could result in some kids like Joseph losing their favorite sport. AB-2571 targets firearms advertising to minors and among its numerous provisions the bill prohibits the use of: “Images or depictions of minors in advertising and marketing materials to depict the use of firearm products.” The bill also imposes a civil penalty of up to to $25,000 for each violation of its terms. As a board member of the California Youth Shooting Sports Association (CYSSA), Perez is concerned about the fate of the sport her son and friends have come to love. “We don’t know exactly where we stand with this new legislation,” Perez told KCRA 3 on Friday. The outreach and communications her organization is doing about the sport of shooting is now in the crosshairs of the new law providing information on youth competitions, programs… even scholarship opportunities related to their sport. “It can be an email, it can be as simple as when we communicate with a phone via an app. It can be considered an ‘advertisement,'” Perez said. So CYSSA is playing it safe and programing all operations for the time being to keep an eye on a sport they are passionate about. CYSSA and other similar groups across the state have joined a complaint filed in federal court to attempt to obtain an injunction against AB-2571. “We really don’t know what the outcome will be,” Perez said. “But we don’t want to do anything because we have hundreds of kids waiting for us to find out what our next steps are.”

Four years ago, Joseph, son of Michelle Perez, decided he didn’t want to play baseball anymore. So he took up shooting instead.

Perez said her son had been interested in target shooting since his freshman year in high school, when he learned how firearms worked and the discipline associated with skeet shooting.

“It’s a sport. Similar to soccer and baseball, except we use guns,” Perez said. She went on to explain, “We don’t use AR-15s. We don’t use handguns. We don’t use anything of the type now portrayed as an assault weapon. We use shotguns… They are for hunting and they are for shooting clay pigeons.”

These pigeons or discs are the targets of the archers.

“They stand there and say, ‘Train!’ and a sound flies away from them and they shoot,” Perez said.

However, a new law in California aimed at banning the sale of firearms to minors could cost some kids like Joseph their favorite sport.

AB-2571 targets firearms advertising to minors and among its numerous provisions the law prohibits the use of: “Images or depictions of minors in advertising and marketing materials to depict the use of firearms products.”

The law also provides for a civil penalty of up to $25,000 for any violation of its provisions.

As a board member of the California Youth Shooting Sports Association (CYSSA), Perez is concerned about the fate of the sport her son and friends have come to love.

“We don’t know exactly where we are with this new legislation,” Perez told KCRA 3 on Friday.

Public relations and communications that your organization undertakes about the sport of shooting are now in the crosshairs of the new law.

The group shuns harsh consequences from the state for sending out information about youth competitions, programs…even scholarship opportunities related to their sport.

“It could be an email, it could be something as simple as when we communicate with a phone through an app. It can be considered an ‘advertisement,'” Perez said.

Therefore CYSSA plays it safe and stops all operations for the time being.

They are also joining a legal effort which they hope will lead to clarity and an opportunity for the youth of their program to focus their attention on a sport they are passionate about.

CYSSA and other similar groups across the state have joined a complaint filed in federal court to attempt to obtain an injunction against AB-2571.

“We really don’t know what the outcome will be,” Perez said. “But we don’t want to do anything because we have hundreds of kids waiting for us to find out what our next steps are.”

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