Vehicle Power Grids for Greater Combat Lethality – US Army | Region & Cash









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The US Army Ground Vehicle Systems Center demonstrated Secure Tactical Advanced Mobile Power, or STAMP for short, a technology that allows multiple vehicles to network their electrical systems together and share power generation on a small power grid. The resulting efficiencies in power generation for multiple vehicles and electrical power output represent significant fuel savings.
(Image credit: VIDS Corp)

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The US Army Ground Vehicle Systems Center demonstrated Secure Tactical Advanced Mobile Power, or STAMP for short, a technology that allows multiple vehicles to network their electrical systems together and share power generation on a small power grid. The resulting efficiencies in power generation for multiple vehicles and electrical power output represent significant fuel savings.
(Image credit: VIDS Corp)

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The US Army Ground Vehicle Systems Center demonstrated Secure Tactical Advanced Mobile Power, or STAMP for short, a technology that allows multiple vehicles to network their electrical systems together and share power generation on a small power grid. The resulting efficiencies in power generation for multiple vehicles and electrical power output represent significant fuel savings.
(Image credit: Jerome Aliotta)

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The US Army Ground Vehicle Systems Center demonstrated Secure Tactical Advanced Mobile Power, or STAMP for short, a technology that allows multiple vehicles to network their electrical systems together and share power generation on a small power grid. The resulting efficiencies in power generation for multiple vehicles and electrical power output represent significant fuel savings.
(Image credit: VIDS Corp)

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DETROIT ARSENAL — Last week, engineers at the US Army’s DEVCOM Ground Vehicle Systems Center, along with their colleagues at the Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Cyber, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C5ISR) Center, demonstrated microgrid technology using a variety of tactical wheeled vehicles on-the-go power generation capabilities.

The team’s technology, dubbed Secure Tactical Advanced Mobile Power or STAMP for short – Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) – allows multiple vehicles to network their electrical systems and share power generation on a small power grid. The resulting efficiencies in power generation for multiple vehicles and electrical power output represent significant fuel savings.

The aim is to show that vehicle power grids with on-board power generation and the ability to export power through power redundancy and fail-safety offer higher combat mortality and at the same time reduce the logistical effort.

The highly mobile and cyber-secure STAMP is a lightweight, fast-forming vehicular hybrid propulsion system aimed at rapidly increasing the combat capability and sustainability of US forces when deployed forward, as well as deploying forces to remote restricted areas (A2/ AD) environments.

In the current power system, each component and support element has its own tactical generator – often trailer-mounted. Since the STAMP system does not have to tow a trailer to provide onboard power, platforms can reduce fuel consumption by 25 percent. In current systems, such generator power is not available even on the go, and many generators are running almost constantly when stationary. The STAMP system operates only the number of connected vehicle assets required to efficiently generate the power the vehicles and warfighters require.

“Legacy tactical propulsion systems reduce combat system availability, create a vulnerable static posture, lack energy storage, lack awareness of consumption, and present challenging logistical requirements,” said Dean McGrew, director of powertrain electrification at GVSC.

With microgrid technology, power generated in-line by the vehicle replaces drawn generator power, while grid-connected power from the vehicle can be used for onboard needs and exported for off-vehicle use.

“This enables anti-idling by providing energy to quickly charge the vehicle’s on-board energy storage with up to 25 percent fuel savings,” said McGrew.

“The integration of power generation, distribution, battery storage, metering, control systems and on-board vehicle performance (OBVP) of mobile tactical platforms into an AC/DC microgrid will improve the resilience, mobility and flexibility of tactical units for distributed execution cross-domain maneuvers in multi-domain operations,” he said.

As future combat will require high mobility of forces in dispersed environments, STAMP will provide universal battlefield strength.

“STAMP gives you greater operational reach and resiliency,” said Mike Gonzalez, Division Manager for Expeditionary Power and Environmental Control at the C5ISR Center and co-engineering director of STAMP JCTD. “It will give commanders the ability to work together, band together, join coalitions, use less fuel, reduce the sustaining burden and provide more bottom-level solutions in multi-domain operations,” he said.

“If you look at this future battlespace, STAMP offers the opportunity to use traditional vehicles, electric vehicles, generators and energy storage, and open the paradigm to future things like renewable energy, as well as other types of energy storage like tanks and future vehicles – all to be used in the field to work together as one energy system,” Gonzalez said.

This vehicle microgrid is 25 percent more efficient than spot-load/spot-supply Tactically Quiet Generators, on par with an AC Hybrid AMMPS (Advanced Medium Mobile Power Source) generator microgrid.

STAMP supports bi-directional power supply between in-vehicle DC and AC microgrids. Vehicles can output up to 100 kW (kilowatts) of 600 VDC (direct current voltage).

The primary early adopters of STAMP are intended to be the Soldiers garrisoning Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) batteries and tactical command posts under the auspices of the Missile Defense Agency and Program Executive Office Command, Control and Communications-Tactical. Other specific use cases include other missile systems, command and control systems, radar systems, and directed energy systems. Other users are identified throughout the JCTD.

While STAMP is currently performed primarily by DOD labs and program offices through the development and integration of individual technical components, in 2023 the testing of these components will culminate in an operational demonstration of the entire set of technologies.
The STAMP JCTD team is working on the transition plan to facilitate DOD adoption of power system capability.

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